Can you hear me now?

Watch the deployment on YouTube: https://youtu.be/IWNKRhyO5GI Researchers all over the world have turned to Passive Acoustic Monitoring (P.A.M.) as a technique to record underwater audio signals from marine mammals.  PAM systems are typically deployed and sit on the bottom or hang in the water column attached to the bottom at various

Continue reading

What’s an S-posture and why do dolphins do it?

By Bethany Augliere Using visual signals, along with vocalizations, is one way whales and dolphins can communicate with one another. The S-posture is one such body signal, where the dolphin bends its body into an S shape. Generally, dolphins use this body posture in two specific social contexts: courtship and

Continue reading

Cracking the Code

There has been recent media coverage about our work with our two-way interface between humans and dolphins (CHAT: Is it a Dolphin Translator or an Interface?).  But did you know that for the last 30 years Wild Dolphin Project has been working on cracking the code of the dolphins own

Continue reading

Life in a Dolphin Pod: Male Social Structure

Life in a Dolphin Pod Part 1: Male Social Structure An exhale, a few black fins slicing through the surface, maybe a leap, and then they disappear. Most people only ever see dolphins from the surface, a glimpse from the beach or while on a boat. But that is only the beginning,

Continue reading

CHAT: Is It A Dolphin Translator Or An Interface?

March 31 2014 article by Dr. Denise Herzing   CHAT:  Is It A Dolphin Translator Or An Interface?   I call it a human/dolphin interface or acoustic keyboard.  The word ‘translator” conjures up images of some magical device that somehow utilizes some universally discovered patterns and translates words to the

Continue reading

Nassau the “Afghan Girl” Dolphin

During the summer of 2013 award-winning photographer Brian Skerry joined the Wild Dolphin Project to photograph Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis) for an article by National Geographic Magazine on dolphin intelligence.   In particular, Brian wanted to photograph an adult female dolphin named Nassau. Nassau was on the September 1992

Continue reading